I'm looking forward to April 4th and 5th, when I'll be giving two one-day workshops, one in Seattle and one in Portland, for cancer survivors, oncology professionals and anyone touched by cancer.. Hello!
I''m looking forward to April 4th and 5th, when I''ll be giving two one-day workshops, one in Seattle and one in Portland, for cancer survivors, oncology professionals and anyone touched by cancer.

The workshop is called Gifts of the Imagination: Guided Imagery for Surviving and Thriving Beyond Cancer and it focuses on how guided imagery helps with healing, coping, thriving, grieving, and reclaiming life during or after cancer. I''ll be offering many guided imagery demos throughout the day, as well as presenting exciting, new research results (including the hot-off-the-presses study cited in this week''s Hot Research page, which concludes that imagery can pump up immune function), answering questions, and offering practical tips on how to best use this simple, gentle but extremely potent technique, which more and more is becoming part of mainstream medicine. For more info, call Jan Adrian at (800) 423-9882, click on www.healingjourneys.org or email [email protected].

I must say I''m still scratching my head from the reaction in the research community to the recently published diabetes/heart disease study that showed that lowering blood sugar with pharmaceuticals not only didn''t reduce the risk of heart attacks in people with type 2 diabetes, but actually raised the risk of death - so much so that this arm of the study was shut down.

The response has been one of great disappointment in the medical community. When they found that chemically lowering blood glucose levels didn''t help staunch cardiac events, they were ready to throw out the whole concept. Jeesh, boys and girls… How about investigating the effects of lowering blood sugar through more natural, organic means, such as meditation, breath work, guided imagery and yoga?? Might this not get the job done without endangering subjects'' life and limb?? Seems like common sense to me, to check that out before abandoning the premise.

Oh well. We make progress a little bit at a time. And progress is being made, after all.

Take care and be well.