Investigators from the Department of Developmental and Educational Psychology at the University of Valencia in Valencia, Spain, examined the effectiveness of a mindfulness-based intervention in breast-feeding mothers.

The research team developed and tested an 8-week mindfulness-based intervention aimed at improving maternal self-efficacy, mindfulness, self-compassion, satisfaction with life, and subjective happiness, and at reducing psychological distress.
 
A randomized controlled, between-groups design was used with treatment and control groups (n = 26) and pretest and posttest measures.

ANCOVA results indicated that, compared to the control group, the mothers in the treatment group scored significantly higher on maternal self-efficacy, some dimensions of mindfulness (observing, acting with awareness, non-judging, and non-reactivity), and self-compassion (self-kindness, mindfulness, over-identification, and total self-compassion).
 
In addition, mothers who received the mindfulness intervention exhibited significantly less anxiety, stress, and psychological distress.
 
The results supported previous research findings about the benefits of mindfulness-based intervention in women from the perinatal and postpartum periods through the early parenting period.
 
Additional research is needed to validate these findings in non-breast-feeding mothers and to examine the intervention's indirect benefits in terms of family relationships and child development.

Citation:  Perez-Blasco J, Viguer P, Rodrigo MF. Effects of a mindfulness-based intervention on psychological distress, well-being, and maternal self-efficacy in breast-feeding mothers: results of a pilot study. Archives of Women’s Mental Health. 2013 Jun;16(3):227-36. doi: 10.1007/s00737-013-0337-z. Epub 2013 Mar 20. [email protected]